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  • How To Move Your Commercial Business

    “It’s essential that the entire team of employees knows exactly what to expect during the move and what part they will each play in your commercial relocation.”

    Anyone in the business world knows how much time and attention it takes to successfully run an office or any commercial business. Meetings, employee concerns and work time, production time, client relations, these things take constant time and attention in order to make a business run smoothly. With all of that in mind, it may seem impossible to add more to your to-do list, but what if you’re looking to relocate? Corporate relocation can be a great business move for many reasons. You may wish to be closer to your target audience, or you may have found a great offer on some commercial real estate. No matter the reason, businesses often find themselves in a position where relocation makes sense. When that happens, there’s no need to feel stressed or think that you don’t have time to manage a move properly. Calling a professional moving company will help you get your office moved with little down time and the utmost efficiency. Knowing what to do before the movers arrive will help streamline the process that much further. Here are a few tips to help you have a smooth office move.


    Assign a Project Manager

    Assigning a project manager (PM) to handle all of your moving tasks is essential to the efficiency of any office move. Just as with any other important task, having an assigned PM will allow you to focus on other parts of running your business with the confidence that projects aren’t being neglected. Take this approach with your corporate relocation. It’s essential that the entire team of employees knows exactly what to expect during the move and what part they will each play in your commercial relocation. Your moving PM will help you cut down on miscommunication and give the rest of your other team members more time to keep up with the daily operations of your business. The best candidate for this task would be an office administrator, personal assistant or someone else whose primary duties include office organization and administrative duties.

    business man in office


    Call Professional Movers

    In the past, you’ve likely explained to clients and potential clients the importance of having tasks, projects or campaigns handled by experts who have experience with what you’d like to accomplish. Moving is no different. If you want to remain efficient and keep your business running like a well-oiled machine, then you have to call professional movers for your commercial move. Professionals will give you and your staff the time and freedom you all need to make sure that your office continues to run smoothly even throughout a commercial move. Just imagine how impressed your clients and customers will be when they find out that you were able to relocate your office without missing a beat.


    Sketch a Floorplan

    A basic floorplan will go a long way in helping the moving crew work quickly and efficiently on moving day. Your professional movers won’t have to stop and ask you or a staff member where each fixture or piece of furniture will go if they already have a floorplan that shows where you would like everything to be.

    When you and your PM create your floorplan, keep in mind the size and shape of your new office and the types of desks, tables and other furniture you’re going to be moving. Think about the kind of atmosphere you want your new office space to have. Your floorplan could inspire spontaneous collaboration, quiet contemplation, guided and focused teamwork or whatever other atmosphere you’re looking for if you draw it out properly and ahead of time. Make sure your PM give the floorplan to the moving crew a few days before moving day, just in case they have questions or in case changes need to be made for logistical purposes.


    Managing an office keeps you busy, so do what you can to eliminate the concerns of an office move. By following a few simple steps, you’ll find yourself with time to focus on what you do best, running your business. 


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  • How To Move-In With A Roommate

    Moving into a new house or apartment can be a challenge. Coordinating with local movers, getting time off work, packing and a host of other tasks need to be completed when you move. Most people have an idea of what to expect when moving alone or with family. After all, in these situations you’re preparing to live with someone whom you’ve known for your whole life, so you can be confident that you know what to expect. This feeling certainly may not always be there when moving into a new house or apartment with a roommate. Depending on how long you’ve known the person you’ll be living with, the same level of comfort may or may not be there. Luckily, moving is an experience that helps bring people together. By being considerate of your new roommate and taking the proper steps to prepare, your move can help establish an initial connection or make an existing one stronger. Moving with a roommate doesn’t have to be difficult either, aside from the regular aspects of every move, there are just a few specific things that will help you move in with a roommate in particular. These simple tips will help make moving into a new home with a roommate and enjoyable experience.

    Moving in with a Roommate

    Align Schedules

    Lining up your schedules will depend largely on the conditions of your move. If you’re moving into a place that your roommate is already living in, you should check with them to see what times are most convenient for them to help with the move. Even if you don’t think you’ll need help, you should try to include your roommate in the process in whatever capacity they are comfortable with.

    You may also want to ask your roommate about the most opportune time to move into your new neighborhood. If you’re moving into an area full of early risers who work 9-5, book your move for 9 or 10 in the morning when there will be fewer cars around, making it easier to maneuver the moving truck. If it’s a college campus or neighborhood full of students, moving around noon may be favorable for the same reasons.

    If you and your roommate are moving at the same time, try your best to do everything together. This will help ensure that you and your roommate are on the same page and that each person has equal say in where things go around the house. Make sure you talk to your roommate about how utilities will be divided, work and or school schedules so that you know how to best respect each other’s time and where furniture and other items should be placed in the home.

    If Your Roommate is Already There

    Aside from coordinating schedules, there are a few unique aspects to moving into a house or apartment that’s already occupied. If this is the situation you’re in, take advantage of it by moving your belongings little-by-little, saving large items for last so you can leave the heavy lifting to movers. When you move little-by-little, you give yourself extra time to pack and make sure that all your affairs and belongings are in order.  This will help you avoid mistakes and prevent you from losing or misplacing items during your move.

    You and your roommate also need to decide on what furniture you will move into the home. If your roommate already has a fully furnished house or apartment, you may need to leave much of your furniture behind to make the living situation work. However, the two of you may decide that you’d like to use some of your furniture to replace what is in the home already. Whatever you both decide, donate or sell all your unwanted furniture, rather than throwing it away.

    Book Now

    One thing you and your roommate will likely agree on is the need to move before it gets too cold and starts to snow. Since the summer is over, it should be relatively easy to find a local moving company that has available time slots, even if you’re booking a same-day move. Make sure that you plan ahead and get your moving day scheduled while the weather is still decent. Lastly, make sure to keep checking our blog for the latest moving tips and advice.

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  • Benefits To Moving In The Fall

    Summer is one of the busiest times of the year for the moving industry in the United States. With kids out of school, it’s no surprise this is the first choice for many families when considering a time to move. For many people, summer may seem like the most convenient time of the year to move, but in many states this is not always the case. If your schedule allows for flexibility, consider picking an off-peak moving season like fall. Here are just a few benefits to moving during the fall.

    Better Prices

    In the summer months moving companies are at their peak seasons. There is a huge demand for movers during June through August, resulting in higher prices and limited moving date options. If you don’t remember to book months in advance, or if your move is sudden and unexpected, you may be stuck with a poor quality mover, or no mover at all. Fall is the most cost-effective time of the year to move and it will also be much easier to get first dibs on your desired moving date. With the rush season over by fall, moving companies will naturally be more willing to accommodate any special dates, schedules or needs you may have for your move. By September, you will find that it is much easier to book a mover, and prices will also be more affordable than if you chose to move during the summer.

    Better Weather

    Many people also choose to move during the summertime because it’s more reliable for sunny days which can make your move easier. But summer could also mean hot temperatures and high humidity. These conditions can make you sweaty and uncomfortable after only a short time of packing and lifting heavy boxes. The heat can make even the simplest activity exhausting and dangerous if a person isn’t properly hydrated. If you plan a move during the fall, it will actually be more pleasant for you because the temperatures are much more mild. The unbearable summer temperatures will have cooled off and you may even feel a nice, cool breeze. This results in a much more efficient and comfortable moving day.

    Buyer Power

    Home buyers can also take advantage of this slow time. Since less people move during the fall, buyers will find they have more power when house-hunting. Although there may be less options to choose from, the market will not be as competitive as it would have been during the peak spring and summer months. This reduces the pressure buyers may feel to submit offers before they are ready, out of fear for losing a home to another buyer, and also lowers the chances of ending up in a bidding war. Since the market will not be as competitive, this could also save buyers money.

    Tips For A Successful Fall Move

    The best way to handle a fall move it to prepare for the conditions you may encounter. With all of the fall moving benefits considered, there are a few extra things you can do to make your fall move a success.

    Clear Any Debris

    Fall can be a very beautiful season with a variety of color-changing leaves but these leaves can also become a safety hazard on moving day. Piles of fallen leaves could unknowingly be covering sticks and wet leaves, becoming especially slippery, all of which can become tripping hazards for you and your movers. Wet leaves can also stick to the bottom of shoes, making any indoor floor surface extremely slippery and dangerous. To prevent potential damage to your belongings as well as injury to yourself and others, it’s crucial that your lawn, sidewalk and any areas around your home are free of leaves on moving day. With so many heavy boxes and furniture to move, it’s important to keep everyone safe on moving day.

    Dress Accordingly

    Like any season, the weather in fall can be unpredictable. Remember to dress appropriately for any unseasonably cold or wet weather. While you certainly can’t predict the weather, you can still plan for it. In the days leading up to your move, pay attention to your local weather forecast so you have an idea of what to might expect. Dressing in layers is great for moving on cold days. If the temperature drops, you will still be warm enough and if the temperature rises, you can easily remove a layer or two. It’s also important to have some rain gear on hand just in case. If you find that wet weather is in the forecast, make sure you have some tarps and blankets on-hand to protect furniture and boxes from getting damaged during loading and unloading. For every move, avoid wearing open-toed sandals and flip-flops. Closed-toe shoes like tennis shoes or sneakers are the safest option you can pick.

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  • Tips For Moving With Pets

    Whether your move is local or long distance, moving with your pet is not always the easiest task depending on your animal. For many pet owners, furry friends are like family. With all of the chaos involved with a move it can actually be easy to forget that your pet will need extra care and attention during your transition. Luckily, we have a few simple ideas in which you can keep your pet’s stress levels to a minimum.

    “Remember to keep pet supplies such as toys, bowls and food off the moving truck! If any unplanned issues arise during your move, your pet may need some of these items.”

    Before the Move

    The most important thing any pet owner can do in the weeks leading up to their move is to create a plan. It’s important that your pet is microchipped or has a properly fitted collar with updated ID tags. Identification tags can be a crucial link towards reuniting you and your lost pet in case the unexpected happens. While moving with a pet, owners may also realize they need to buy a new crate or specialized seat belt to keep their pets secure on moving day. Most pets hate change, but owners can limit this stress by introducing the new item to their pet weeks before the move. This will give pets time to adjust to their new crate or restraint and, in turn, will make moving day easier on you.

    Car Rides

    If you pet gets car sick, make sure to visit the vet before your move to receive the proper medications and feeding recommendations. For long distance moves, research pet-friendly hotels along your route and make reservations in advance. Don’t forget to stop for breaks with your leashed pet so they can relieve themselves and stretch their legs.

    Moving Day

    All of the extra sounds and people on your moving day can create a stressful environment for any animal. Secure your pet in a quiet area if possible, such as their crate or in a closed room away from all of the commotion until you are ready to load them in your car. This will prevent an accidental escape and will help keep your pet relaxed. Also, remember to keep pet supplies such as toys, bowls, and food off the moving truck! If any unplanned issues arise during your move, your pet may need some of these items. The familiar scents will also make their transition a lot easier.

    After Moving Day

    Many pet owners are excited to introduce furry friends to their new homes or apartments, but this can actually induce stress for animals. Instead of allowing animals to roam free immediately, it’s helpful to isolate pets in a quiet area then slowly introduce them to their new home. In the beginning, keep pets leashed at all times while outdoors. The stress of a move can cause even the most obedient pet to run away in an unfamiliar place.

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  • Cross Country Moving Tips

    There can be challenges associated with any out of state move, such as deciding what belongings to keep or altering your insurance policies. This is especially true when moving from one side of the country to the other. The U.S. is one of the biggest countries in the world, so when moving from Miami to Seattle or from Minnesota to Arizona, you have to make some special considerations. Luckily we’ve seen our fair share of cross country moves, so we know what it takes to have a stress-free move.


    Tips for Moving Out of State

    • If you're planning a cross country move, you’ve probably already chosen a new place to live in your new state. But how many times have you actually walked through and thoroughly checked out your new property? It’s a good idea to schedule a trip to visit your new home before you move, if you have the time. Being able to inspect your new home is vital because it gives you a concrete idea of any repairs that may need to be addressed when you move in.

    • If you’re moving into an apartment, it’s especially important to know the exact parameters of your lease and to be familiar with the property in advance. If you won’t have a chance to scope out apartments in advance, see if you can stay with family or sublet until you find a place. It’s important not to go into any move blind.

    • When you’re getting ready for a long distance move, it’s important to pack lightly. Transporting items across the country can be expensive, especially when those items are heavy or take up a lot of space. Downsizing before you move will help cut down the weight of the truck and the loading and unloading time for the movers, saving you money. You can often save money by selling large, heavy or other replaceable items and getting new ones when you arrive at your destination. Check online for discounts and deals on new items because online retailers will often offer free, scheduled shipping and assembly for the purchase of big ticket items. This allows you to have new items delivered for free rather than paying to transport old one’s thousands of miles. Don’t forget to donate any unwanted items that you can’t sell.

    • When preparing for a cross country move, it’s important to remember that you have to do more than pack and transfer utilities. Doctor and dentist appointments, family affairs, and even goodbye parties can become last minute without a well-managed calendar. Make sure you start getting ready for your long distance move as early as possible and that you schedule everything that needs to be done before you leave. Check out our planning guide for help with your pre-move checklist.


    • After Your Long Distance Move
    • Make sure to pack a separate suitcase and a few moving boxes full of things you’ll need immediately upon moving in. This will let you take your time while unpacking, so you can spend more time getting acclimated to your new home state.

    For more advice and tips on preparing for your move, including more advice on what to do after you move in, check out our blog page.

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  • Tips for Moving a Big Family

    Getting a family ready for a local or long distance move can be time consuming. There are so many moving parts when it comes to getting a family ready to move and sometimes, it may seem difficult to keep up. If you have a large family, it may seem like these obstacles can become overwhelming. However, moving with a large family doesn’t have to be a daunting task. Here are a few tips that we’ve learned that will help make moving a large family a breeze.

    Babysitter – The simplest way to make moving day easier is to find a babysitter for young children. Not only can moving large furniture and other items be a hazard, but moving often doesn’t hold the attention of small kids. In our experience, children under 12 are often better off with friends and family.

    Pack Enough Clothes for a Few Days – Getting organized in a new home takes time. Often, people who have recently moved tend to live out of boxes and suitcases for a little while. Make the transition easier on your family by setting aside boxes and suitcases specifically for immediate use. These should include clothes, toiletries and other items that you may need on an immediate and daily basis. With your family’s immediate needs taken care of, you can spend more time unpacking, which will help keep things organized.

    Food Prep – Knowing what your family is going to eat ahead of time will save you a lot of time and make moving day easier. Make sure you have plenty of disposable plates and flatware, so that you can pack up the kitchen ahead of time.

    It’s also best to cook enough meals in the days before you move to allow your family to eat leftovers until moving day. This cuts down on the take-out you might order and allows cleaning out the fridge a lot easier.

    Make Sure All Phones Are Charged – Everyone, from your oldest child to your grandparents, should have their phones fully charged on moving day. Nothing slows a move down like a large family that can’t effectively communicate. Considering that modern phones can track weather, traffic and get directions, having a fully charged phone should be top priority. You can also use your phone to entertain the kids during the trip to your new home.

    When you’re moving with a big family, being prepared and knowing what to expect is everything. If you follow these four tips, you’ll have a great basis for completing a big family move.

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  • How To Declutter During Your Move

    When you've lived in a place for a long time, you tend to gather a lot of things. It can be easy to overlook the clutter building up around your home, but when you get ready to move you may start to notice the sheer amount of stuff you own. A lot of people find that decluttering during a move is actually one of the easiest and most efficient ways to get clean and organized. Since you have to pack up everyhting anyway, you might as well decide what to keep and what to discard.

    But if you haven't moved or decluttered in a long time it may be difficult to decide what should stay and what should go. That's were we come in, with more than 90 years of moving experience, we've seen what works best when decluttering. That's why we've put together this list to help you decide what to get rid of when decluttering.


    Guide to Decluttering

    1. For starters, you likely have a lot of old knickknacks lying around that you haven't thought about in years. Old participation medals or trophies from high-school, souvenirs from family vacations, cheap prizes from the fair three years ago, all of these things can likely go. Digital pictures are just as good for hanging on to memories and take up far less physical space.
    2. Take a long look at what you have in your closet and try to remember the last time you wore each item. If you can't remember the last time you wore those brightly-colored, plaid golf shorts, then it's likely you wont be wearing them again anytime soon. There are  a lot of people who can benefit from the clothes you're not wearing so as you declutter, make a pile for Goodwill and kill two birds with one stone.
    3. Music, movies, home videos, video games and other forms of entertainment media should be stored digitally. Just about everything is available for digital download or streaming these days, so there's really no need to take up space with physical copies. Digitally stored media is often more secure since it can be backed up via the cloud and many distribution services let customers re-download previously purchased material that they may have lost.
    4. You'll notice that digitizing is a bit of a theme on this list. That's because we live in a time where a lot of space can be saved by owning things digitally. However, there are those who love holding the physical copy of their favorite book or novel.  It's also not as easy to digitize a book you own as it is a movie. Here's how to solve this dilemma: if it holds sentimental value, is signed by the author, you plan on reading it soon, or read it regularly, it stays. Everything else on your bookshelf gets donated.
    5. It can be really hard to let go of old sporting equipment, mostly because of the investment something like golf clubs or a pair of skis represents. At some point though, you just be honest with yourself. Are you holding on the those clubs because of that planned Sunday afternoon golf outing with the fellas, you know, the one that was planned 60 Sundays ago? Are those skis being saved for that family ski trip once the kids are old enough, even though the oldest just turned 2? If so, then it's time to let go.

    Lastly, remember to always appraise anything may be an antique, before deciding to get rid of it. If you follow these five pieces of advice, you'll find that your moving experience will be far less stressful. You'll have fewer things to load up and unpack, and you'll have a clear purpose for the things you do bring.

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  • 6 Tasks to Complete After You Move In

    If you’ve just completed a big move to a new home, you may be wondering what to do next. Well, after getting unpacked, there are a few key tasks for getting started in a new home that you’ll want to take care of. Soon you’ll be able to kick back and relax, but for now, check out our list of things to make sure you get done just after moving in.

    Moving Checklist: What to Do After You Move

    1. Transfer Utilities – If you haven't already done so, make certain that all of your necessary utilities are up and running. Transferring utilities is often as simple as filling out a form online or making a quick call to the utilities company. Get this taken care of about a week before you move in to ensure that you’re ready for that first night in your new home.
    2. Keep Your Important Documents/Receipts Together – You know how important it is to hold on to documents such as birth certificates and passports. What you may not know is that in certain circumstances you may be able to claim moving expenses on your tax return. That’s why it’s important to also keep things like your Bill of Lading from your move.  We recommend keeping all of these documents in a lockable, fireproof safe that can be purchased at many department stores.
    3. Update Your Insurance Policies – Shortly before or after moving in, you’ll want to contact your insurance provider and make sure your policies are updated. This is especially true of your home and auto policies which are almost always affected by a change in location.
    4. Forward the Mail – This one of the most often-forgotten tasks during a move. The mail is something a lot of us take for granted, so it’s easy to overlook. Luckily, forwarding the mail is quick and simple and can be done online. 
    5. Change Your Locks – The fact is, it’s almost impossible to track how many copies of a key there are for an old lock. However, it’s very easy to track how many copies exist for a brand new lock. A simple way to help ensure home security is to get all of the locks changed when you move in.
    6. Get to Know Your New Neighborhood – One thing that can make getting acclimated to a new city or town easier is getting to know the neighbors. Try throwing a barbecue or dinner party and invite people from around the neighborhood. Not only will this make a good impression, but your new neighbors can share important information about your new area.

    Check out our moving tips page for more advice on how to have the best moving experience possible.

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  • Minneapolis Tech Startup Reemo Creates App to Help Seniors Live Independently

    One thing we've learned after serving the families and businesses of Minneapolis and St. Paul for the last 90 years is that the Twin Cities are brimming with creative, forward-thinking entrepreneurs. This was no more apparent to us than when we came across a recent article by Patrick Kennedy in the Star Tribune titled “Developing Technology to Help Seniors Live Independently”.

    In his article, Kennedy showcases Minneapolis-based business partners Al Baker and Muhammad Abdurrahman and their technology startup Reemo, which is developing an app to help seniors operate household devices via a smartwatch.

    Smartwatch Controls Household Devices

    Reemo was born in 2012, with the hopes of helping Abdurrahman's father maintain his independent lifestyle after he suffered a series of strokes, Kennedy says. They also wanted to eliminate the risk of Abdurrahman's father experiencing a potentially dangerous fall while completing daily tasks around the house. 

    With the surging popularity of mobile devices and wearables, Baker and Abdurrahman came up with a solution that embraces the next wave of technology and makes operating household devices much easier, which in turn allows them to live on their own for longer as well.

    The two business partners created a wearable, easy-to-use technology that lets seniors control their TV and other digital devices via a smartwatch and simple body gestures. According to Kennedy, the technology works by pairing bluetooth receivers to the desired household devices via an app on a smartphone. From there, the smartwatch takes the information from the phone and essentially becomes a remote control itself, carrying out a variety of functions when the person wearing it acts out a handful of distinct body motions.

    “It’s always available, it’s always mobile, you don’t have to drop it, and you can forget about it if you don’t want it,” Baker told the Star Tribune.

    Kennedy says that this Reemo technology is compatible with several types of smartwatches and that Baker and Abdurrahman are extremely optimistic about the future of their company and how they can continue to help seniors throughout the United States.

    “We are in a very, very strong market with very strong technology and (intellectual property). So we are poised to scale very, very well,” Baker said.

    At Bester Brothers Transfer & Storage, we applaud Baker and Abdurrahman for their efforts and wish them the best of luck. Their hard work and ingenuity exemplifies why the Twin Cities are such a great place to live and work. If you're a senior and need help with moving and storage, please fill out our form for a free quote.

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  • Relocation Therapy

    Sometimes, a change of address is good medicine.

    Joanne Kaufman from the New York Times wrote an intriguing article this week related to the notion that there are events in life—a breakup, a death, or even an illness where relocating elsewhere actually turns into good medicine for the soul.  In this piece the New York Time’s  spoke to numerous individuals who thought the best medicine was to relocate.:

    According to the Times, just as many legions swear to retail therapy as a way of dealing with a bad day. Many others deal with larger traumatic events by a form of real estate therapy. A new home, or an exciting new move can mean much more to some than a change of address. “If Real Estate is a big part of your problem, it’s possible that real estate can solve it,” said Elayne Reimer, executive vice president of Halstead Property.

    Though it is an expensive form of therapy, this real estate cure has many converts. “Economically it wasn’t a good time to sell my condo,” said Ms. Kotcher, a Fort Lee transplant on the Upper East Side. “But I asked myself “What’s more important?”: Psychological well-being, or money in the bank you can’t get any interest on anyway?”

    Though, as with any purchase there can be a buyers’ remorse the Times article goes on to say.  Eight years ago, Paul Purcell, a founder of Rutenberg Realty, split with his partner of two decades and sold their 41st floor place “with a view to die for” in the Olympic Tower at Fifth Avenue and 51st in New York City.

    Later, Purcell  bought a perfectly fine one-bedroom in the East 50s, but put off doing the things that would have turned the apartment into a home. And yet, just the other week Mr. Purcell was walking past the Olympic Tower. “And the door-man was the same doorman as when we lived there,” he recalled. “And he said, ‘Mr. Purcell!’ And I hugged him and I went into the lobby and saw the concierge and the elevator operators and they all hugged me.” Purcell called his former partner and said: “Why did we ever leave? We loved it, we adored it. We adored the apartment.” He then added “You know, we really should have figured out a way to hold on to it.”

    Psychologically is this the right thing to do? “There’s no right answer,” said Dr. Gail Saltz the clinical associate professor of psychology at New York- Prebytarian Hospital, according to the Times.  “Our home represents comfort  and another way of identifying ourselves,” she said. “Your identity is changed by loss, so you think of changing your house, too.”

    People see a move “as a way of starting over, ” she added, “even a way of undoing the bad thing that has happened. It’s a defense mechanism.”

    “We don’t process things instantly,” she said. “Being guided by a desire to run might lead you to a financially or emotionally unwise decision for yourself.” Unless, she said, “it means moving somewhere you had always wanted to be anyways.”

    What are your thoughts on relocation therapy? Is a fresh start in a new location the best medicine? Leave your thoughts in our comments section and thank you for visiting Moving Help Tips!

     
    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/06/realestate/relocation-therapy.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

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